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lspoly

Calculates a set of coefficients for a weighted least squares polynomial fit to the given data.

Prototype

	function lspoly (
		x     : numeric,  
		y     : numeric,  
		wgt   : numeric,  
		n [1] : integer   
	)

	return_val  :  float or double

Arguments

x

Abscissa values of the data.

This can be one-dimensional or multi-dimensional. If one-dimensional, it must be the same length as the rightmost dimension of y. If multi-dimensional, it must be the same dimensionality as y.

y

Ordinate values of the data.

This can be one-dimensional or multi-dimensional. If one-dimensional, it must be the same length as the rightmost dimension of x. If multi-dimensional, it must be the same dimensionality as x.

wgt

Weights for a weighted least squares model. If all data values are to be assigned equal weights, then setting the argument equal to a scalar 1.0 will result in all the weights being set to 1.0. Note: if x or y is equal to _FillValue (if present), the weight will be set to 0.0 for that coordinate pair.

n

The number of coefficients desired (i.e., n-1 will be the degree of the polynomial). Due to the computational method used, n should be less than or equal to five.

Return value

The return array will have the same dimensionality as y, except the rightmost dimension will be of length n.

If either x or y are of type double, then the return array is returned as double. Otherwise, the returned coefficients are returned as type float.

Description

Given a set of data (x(i),y(i)), i = 1,...,m, lspoly calculates a set of coefficients for a weighted least squares polynomial fit to the given data. It is necessary that the number of data points) be greater than n (the number of coefficients).

Accuracy: for lower order polynomials (n .le. 5), lspoly can be expected to give satisfactory results.

Algorithm: lspoly forms the normal and solves the resulting square linear system using gaussian elimination with full pivoting.

Note: In NCL versions 6.1.2 and earlier, this function would fail in certain cases where the input data were "scaled" down. We replaced this routine with a SLATEC version. It takes the same arguments, but uses a different algorithm under the hood. You can get the "old" (pre NCL V6.2.0) version of lspoly by using "lspoly_old", but we don't recommend it for regular use.

Use lspoly_n if you want to specify which dimension(s) to do the calculation across.

See Also

lspoly_n, regCoef, regline, regcoef, reg_multlin

Examples

Example 1

  x = (/-4.5, -3.2, -1.4, 0.8, 2.5, 4.1/)
  y = (/ 0.7,  2.3,  3.8, 5.0, 5.5, 5.6/)

  n = 4
  c = lspoly(x,y, 1, n)    ; all weights are set to one 
  print(c)
The 3rd degree polynomial is
         Y = c(0) + c(1)*x + c(2)*x^2 + c(3)*x^3
The coefficients (which agree with those returned from Mathematica) are:
(0)      4.66863          
(1)      0.489392        
(2)     -0.0742387      
(3)      0.00267663